10NM

This morning we did not cook breakfast in attempt to be on the water early as wind seems to be weaker in early hours. First half hour it worked then wind picked up and we were fighting to cross Exmouth bay. I think today we had strongest headwind so far, probably solid 6 at times. It took us over four hours to get to Teignmouth. So now we are laying on concrete in Babbacombe Bay and looking forward to tomorrow winds.

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Slow progress

Yesterday we managed to battle headwind for 9 hours today we lasted only 7 and did incredible progress of 25 km. We had all sorts of weather only headwind is not getting any weaker. Unfortunately reception is not good enough to upload short movie. Headwind’s forecasts for tomorrow, too. We will attempt to make the same distance as guys in London at Kayakathon.

The story of the dry suit continues

This morning was a happy morning for all. Michal was happy that we’re paddling again, I was happy that my dry suit was back with new neck seal, and the dry suit was probably happy, too, for being with us and not in some strangers’ work shop.
Jean-Pierre contacted Typhoon on my behalf and they offered to replace the old dry suit with a new one. They would have one ready for Monday. Unfortunately they insisted on direct swap, something I am unable to do as we need to go when we can and at the moment I live in the dry suit.
And so we said good bye to Ian and Barbara and left our temporary home in Burton Bradstock. In Lime Regis on the 11th day of wearing the dry suit I discovered a hole in it. The stitches in the top material on my knee are coming loose. It is probably that not enough material was secured in the stitching.
What to say? I hope Typhoon understands my situation and would be able to send replacement to someone who will then meet us. Let’s hope nothing else would go wrong with it, it’s still cold for non drysuit, especially if you paddle almost daily.

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INTRODUCING JOSHUA HAROON

We would like to share with you the great achievement Joshua Haroon has made. Bellow is clip of Josh using his step by step switch.

You would probably think that there is nothing special about it, any other child could do that and maybe even much younger than Josh. You would be right, the thing is Joshua’s learning style is different to many other children. It is very  unique and requires lot of hard work done by him, his parents and professional team. The research states that children and adults who have the range of impairments and disability Josh has, need to do or try something at least approximately 2000 times before they can remember it and learn it. All this learning has to be facilitated by others.
Josh was introduced to the switch after the previous block of Bobath therapy in July last year. At the start it was used a lot in play and was placed under his feet because Josh seemed to have more control over his kicking than his hands. You can see in the clip that Josh is still keeping the left hand closed in a fist and close to his mouth as he may not yet be that confident to explore his environment fully. His right hand fortunately stays open and means that Josh is ready to explore and to learn more. This is another great step he achieved, and something which helps him now with the switch.
At the last block, February/March, his Speech and Language Therapist at Bobath saw that Josh’s understanding had increased and was able to use the switch further into play and learning. Josh also had to become accustomed to new position, sitting, and to use his hand functionally. This is very hard for Josh, because when he wants to engage the muscles in his arms he increases their tone which makes movement uncoordinated. His physiotherapist worked on reducing the tone and actually took Josh back a stage in order for him to learn to bring his arms down and out.
The added complication of Joshua’s visual impairment means that he is not motivated by sight. It takes him longer to learn the repetitive motion of a task because he has no visual stimulus. To start with Josh had to be reminded that the switch was there. His hands and arms were stroked to remind him that he needs to use them and were brought to the switch to demonstrate to him what to do, over and over again.
Finally he is beginning to play with his switch without coaxing. As you can see in the clip, Joshua wants to continue the song and therefore goes back to the switch. You can also see in his facial expressions that he recognises when he succeeded with the task.
Why is this so important? Josh has oral motor difficulties, which means that speaking may be a long way off. Switch work may be a method of communication for Josh. Perhaps further down the line a communication board may help Josh begin to make choices, like ‘yes’ or ‘no’.
Josh has the potential, and we would like to make sure that he can access as many sessions at Bobath as he can. So help us by going to our donate page and contributing what you can.
You would probably think that there is nothing special about it, any other child could do that and maybe even much younger than Josh. You would be right, the thing is Joshua’s learning style is different to many other children. It is very unique and requires lot of hard work done by him, his parents and professional team. The research states that children and adults who have the range of impairments and disability Josh has, need to do or try something at least approximately 2000 times before they can remember it and learn it. All this learning has to be facilitated by others.
Josh was introduced to the switch after the previous block of Bobath therapy in July last year. At the start it was used a lot in play and was placed under his feet because Josh seemed to have more control over his kicking than his hands. You can see in the clip that Josh is still keeping the left hand closed in a fist and close to his mouth as he may not yet be that confident to explore his environment fully. His right hand fortunately stays open and means that Josh is ready to explore and to learn more. This is another great step he achieved, and something which helps him now with the switch.
At the last block, February/March, his Speech and Language Therapist at Bobath saw that Josh’s understanding had increased and was able to use the switch further into play and learning. Josh also had to become accustomed to new position, sitting, and to use his hand functionally. This is very hard for Josh, because when he wants to engage the muscles in his arms he increases their tone which makes movement uncoordinated. His physiotherapist worked on reducing the tone and actually took Josh back a stage in order for him to learn to bring his arms down and out.
The added complication of Joshua’s visual impairment means that he is not motivated by sight. It takes him longer to learn the repetitive motion of a task because he has no visual stimulus. To start with Josh had to be reminded that the switch was there. His hands and arms were stroked to remind him that he needs to use them and were brought to the switch to demonstrate to him what to do, over and over again.
Finally he is beginning to play with his switch without coaxing. As you can see in the clip, Joshua wants to continue the song and therefore goes back to the switch. You can also see in his facial expressions that he recognises when he succeeded with the task.
Why is this so important? Josh has oral motor difficulties, which means that speaking may be a long way off. Switch work may be a method of communication for Josh. Perhaps further down the line a communication board may help Josh begin to make choices, like ‘yes’ or ‘no’.
Josh has the potential, and we would like to make sure that he can access as many sessions at Bobath as he can. So help us by going to our donate page and contributing what you can.

Dry suit

Originally I wasn’t thinking about using dry suit since I do not like its tightness around the neck. Talking to Dave Felton while he fitted us with kayaks persuaded me to get one brand new dry suit, too. I choose one from Thyphoon since they do a great size called SRelax aimed at short nicely curved women. Bio-seal sorted the problem with the neck. The dry suit arrived with thermals, so my joy at having paddling clothes sorted was enormous.

Not for long. Bellow is a clip of what happened with the thermals.

I sorted that by leaving them behind and buying new thermal trousers.

Then, a week later the dry suit had its say, too. Look what happened with my neck seal. It is true it was trimmed a bit to make it less tight, but very carefully to avoid such events. It was only used for eleven paddling days.

Fortunately it ripped now and here, close to Portland where the company called O’Three agreed to fix it as soon as possible. So should be ready for Thursday afternoon.

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From Purbeck to South West Coast

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Yesterday evening when we were sitting at Kimmeridge and enjoying the evening sun, thinking about where to pitch our tent, Mark Rainsley visited us again. We were also discussing our plans for the following day. The forecast for the following few days promised strong winds and not much paddling for us. The tides to go around Portland were running early morning. There would be firing from the firing range between Kimmeridge and Lulworth cove from 9.30 am to 5pm. This combination of information did not sound good, on top of that we knew that we could get away with only one night at Kimmeridge.

In the end with the help of Mark’s presence the hard and only decisions was made. We would be getting up early, silly o’clock early, and would be paddling forever to get as far as possible to the other side. We had one little help to motivate ourselves. We were offered bed and shower at Burton Bradstock by Barbara and Ian.

And so this morning we woke up at 2.30 finished our precooked breakfast, packed and left at 4.30am, With half the stuff packed already it took us only 2 hours! The paddle was calm, the day broke and everything was peaceful. We crossed straight to the Bill, about 15NM. We got there at about 10 am! Made a short stop and continued towards Chesil Beach making another crossing, landing for a short lunch and continuing in deteriorating conditions to Burton.

Barbara and Ian were waiting on a beach giving us encouragements and then waiting again at the place of landing. Unloading and getting to their house was fast and straightforward. We had paddled for 12 hours.

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Jurassic Coast (written on Sunday, unable to upload)

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Yesterday evening we met with Mark Rainsley and had dinner with him and Heather in their local pub in Corfte Castle. We are also now taking their spare tent pegs on a sea kayak trip. Thank you.
Today started with a sunny and warm morning and the day ahead looked promising. Our plan was to leave early as possible, achieved this 9.30am, and caught the end of the ebbing tide around St Alban’s Head, stopped for lunch at Kimmeridge and continued towards Portland. There we wanted to camp on a beach close to Pensylvania Castle. We had a great paddle with following sea all the way to St Alban’s. There we met a fleet of yachts and had to do yacht dodging as some of them tried to run us over. This was only the beginning.
Once we passed the headland the wind picked up and we had a real struggle to paddle against it. We made it towards Chapman’s pool and continued, but the last five hundred metres before Kimmeridge I thought of getting out and pulling the boat behind me.
In Kimmeridge we reliazed that we had no energy to continue, both of us were also very cold. We called it a day.
Before that we had to make a hard decision of not continuing towards Portland and maybe risking some unfavourable conditions for the next few days, but will worry about that later. Now we need to get some rest and renew our energy levels. After all we have been paddling for 14 days, not living out usual routine, and every morning and evening is hard work to get started or settled.

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Harry’s to Harry’s

We left Bournemouth and decided to cross straight to Old Harry Rocks. On the way we met the fast ferry from Jersey.
I like Old Harry Rocks. In our early kayaking days we came here on a day trip with an instructor. We went from Studland Bay, had lunch in Ballard’s Bay and went back. I thought it was the best place ever. Well, one of many. But I still think that paddle around Old Harry Rocks is one of “the best paddles in the world”.
I liked it yesterday even though I wasn’t alowed to go through the gaps with my heavy loaded boat as Michal claimed there wasn’t enough water. But he doesn’t like it there much.

Photos will follow